Continuing with Continuum

Had a play with continuum these last few days and the verdict: It’s cool, but I don’t get it!

As I’ve said in a previous post Microsoft aren’t the first to try this trick of turning your phone in to your laptop or PC and for me I don’t see the point. The idea, I think, is to make your PC smaller, more versatile and flexible meaning you can take it anywhere. Reality is you need your phone, a mouse, keyboard, a monitor and Continuum plus all the wires that connect them. Not sure how Microsoft think this makes the phone easier to carry around?

Connecting Continuum up was super easy and it all powered up with no issues at all. I thought the idea of using your phone home screen as your start display was great. The dynamic twisting and turning of the app tiles worked perfectly and I was super impressed when loading and shutting down apps.

The big sell for Microsoft, at the moment, is the professional programs like Word, Excel, Powerpoint, etc. You get a scaled back version of these desktop apps, but you still get everything you basically need to do anything you want. I personally ran large files with over 15 years of financial forecasting connecting more than 6 spreadsheets and it work swimmingly. Something I didn’t expect it to be able to handle.

The multitasking was really quite buggy though. As the above image shows, whilst you have something on the big screen you can play around on the phone accessing other apps and continue what you’re doing. I found that if I tried multi tasking like this the Excel, Word or Powerpoint file would crash. One time I was on Skype on the phone discussing the spreadsheet in front of me and the phone completely froze and I had to reset the whole thing.

The first time I used Continuum I had a few user error issues with the mouse and the phone. You can use the phone as the mouse if you wish, but if you put the mouse and phone too close together things get confused very easily and the portable mouse wont work. It took a few curse words before I figured that one out. Very red faced!

For me one thing Microsoft has never struggled with is hardware. Believe it or not Microsoft have been in the hardware game a lot longer than people realise, nearly as long as Apple. They just didn’t make huge volumes of laptops or desktops. The devices they’ve always come out with have always had good looks and appeal (other than the Lumia 950XL that’s been hit with the ugly stick like the 1520). And again they’ve always had great software, but because Microsoft are so late to the smart phone/device market they’ve been left so far behind that they are really struggling to catch up. Even though they deliver great software and are trying to make developers lives easier with their cross platform technologies developers are still not really interested. And I feel this could happen again with Windows 10. With Windows Phone 7 and then 8.1 they still didn’t have many of the big apps and looking at the apps coming out no one is developing for Windows Phone and I don’t understand why developers are doing this. I’m involved in three big apps coming out this year in Fintech and Insurtech sectors and each one of them I’ve made sure will be available on Windows Phone. Though the numbers may not be as high as Android or iOS the users are loyal and deserve great apps.

Overall Continuum is a great concept, but reality is very different. I’d rather a good looking, solid and robust phone (which the Lumia 950 has in abundance and I recommend) and a fantastic bit of kit like the Surface Book or Pro 4. They’ve made these two so great I think that they’ve already made Continuum redundant.

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